MARK LINDQUIST  ICHIBOKU SCULPTURES

     

 

 

 


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"...The most striking feature of Mark Lindquist's wood sculptures is that they still have so much of the tree in them.  In Lindquist's case, it is this regard which unites his crafts background and his interest in Japan: in both, respect for material as itself has been acceptable. 
It is Lindquist's not inconsiderable achievement to reveal this attitude in his sculpture...."

-Janet Koplos

Mark Lindquist
Review in Art in America
By Janet Koplos


"... Lindquist plays with the aesthetics of bent and contorted tree trunks, making cracks a medium of expression which he enhances through a process of chiseling and sanding.  Instead of allowing technique and the craft aesthetic to lead him to overly deliberated forms, he has achieved... a spirit of collaboration with his chosen material, enhancing the age and contortion of the tree trunks.  The various sculptures in the series recall the grand traditions of modernist art evident in the work of Brancusi and Noguchi, among others, even though they cannot be construed in any way as imitation of those earlier works...."

-Robert Hobbs
(
Rhoda Thalhimer Endowed Professor of American Art History, Virginia Commonwealth University )

Mark Lindquist
Review in Sculpture
By  Robert Hobbs


"... Lindquist's profound respect for wood leads him to seek his goals through Buddhist ideals... Lindquist remains the closest to the spirit of the tree.  He works with nature as did the sculptors of Ichiboku.  He imposes no unnatural sense of form, no metaphor and no figurative association.  His deep hatchet-like strokes across the surface release the inner dynamic and allow the essential form to be...."
-Josephine Gear
(Former Director of the Whitney Museum of American Art at Phillip Morris)
 

Mark Lindquist
Catalog essay from
EIGHT CONTEMPORARY SCULPTORS: Beyond Nature, Wood Into Art -THE LOWE ART MUSEUM 
By Josephine Gear



 




 

 

 
 

Mark Lindquist
ICHIBOKU GROUP
1990
Mongaku (left), Natabori (center), Yama Uba (right)
Life Size (in situ - sculptures are approx. 6' H)

Installation, Gadsden Arts Center, Quincy, FL
(Works on Loan)

     
 

Mark Lindquist
Akikonomu
(Ichiboku Series)
19
89

Cherry / Polychrome
73 1/2" H x 22"D

Collection of The Renwick Gallery
Smithsonian American Art Museum
Washington, DC

Gift of Jane and Arthur Mason

 

     
CLICK PHOTO FOR LARGER IMAGE  

Mark Lindquist
Kino Kami II
(Ichiboku Series)
1992

Cherry / Polychrome
52" H x 34" W x 28"D

 

 

     
 

Mark Lindquist
Ascending Ichiboku Column
(Totemic / Ichiboku Series)
199
3

Pecan / Polychrome
70" H x 21" D

 

     
 

Mark Lindquist
Hompashiki II
(Ichiboku Series)
199
5

Cherry / Polychrome, Steel
58" H x 28" D (at base)

 

     
 

Mark Lindquist
Atsumori
(Ichiboku Series)
199
0

Pecan / Polychrome
62" H x 24" W x 24"D

 

     
 

Mark Lindquist
Hompashiki I
(Ichiboku Series)
1992

Pecan / Polychrome
50" H x 26" W x 20"D

 

     
 

Mark Lindquist
Natabori II

(Ichiboku Series)
1992

Cherry / Polychrome
64 1/2" H x 20"D

 
     
  Mark Lindquist with his Ichiboku Sculptures.
A photo montage suggesting relative scale.
Photo of Mark Lindquist - self-portrait taken
by Mark in his Quincy, FL photo studio circa 2005.

(Click the image for a larger view)
 
     

Click photo for more information

  Mark Lindquist Uses special robotic equipment that he designs and builds for special aspects of the making of his sculptures.  Click on the photo (left) to see Hompashiki II being made at Lindquist Studios. 
     

Click for Titles-Mark Lindquist Ichiboku Sculptures - Copyright Mark Lindquist 1989
 

Click photo for more information on the complete Ichiboku Series

   

 

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